Clark on Causation

Which came first, the cause or the effect?  Cause, you’d probably say.  Isn’t it obvious that since causes cause effects they must be before them?  Nope.  Not to everyone.  Take a minute to think of a definition of the term “cause.”  How do you use the term?  Why do you […]

0003 Readings in the History of Philosophy – Thales of Miletus

For an explanation of this series, see 0001 – Readings in the History of Philosophy – Introduction   Thales of Miletus (624-586 BC) is regarded by many to be the first philosopher of the western world.  He is noted for being one of the first to predict events in astronomy, […]

Aristotle’s Theory of Predication

In ancient Greece, the arguments of Parmenides of Elea exposed the need for a theory of predication.  Aristotle supplied a controversial but generally robust theory in which he believed he escaped the counterintuitive conclusions of Parmenides.  I found a very good treatment of this theory in Predication, Homonym, and the […]

Gordon Clark on Aristotle’s Theory of Motion

In Thales to Dewey, Gordon Clark provides a fairly detailed analysis of the basics of Aristotle’s system of thought.  These basics are still debated today because they don’t only apply to Aristotelianism.  Concepts such as definition, substance, unity, individuation, motion, space, time, etc. are ideas used by almost everybody.  However, […]