Review of Classical Apologetics by Sproul, Gerstner, and Lindsley

By Gordon H. Clark                 This book[1] is divided, not sharply, for each part somewhat overlaps the others in subject matter, but nevertheless is divided into two parts. The first defends the cosmological argument for the existence of God, an argument which, as […]

Sawing Lessons: Kierkegaard’s Concluding Unscientific Postscript

Sawing Lessons “In the great forests of North Dakota, there lived a rough old sawyer named Dawkins.  In his early years, Dawkins dominated the region with his woodcutting abilities; able to produce as much sawn wood as any ten sawyers in the region combined.  As he grew older, he took […]

Bultmann Reads Mother Goose

I am currently reading Gordon Clark’s commentary on 1 John.  Occasionally, it brings up a particular interpretation of the well-known scholar Rudolph Bultmann. Among other things, Bultmann is known for his belief that the historical analysis of the New Testament is both futile and unnecessary, given that the earliest Christian literature […]

Clark on Van Til’s “solution” to the Problem of the One and the Many

While teaching at Wheaton College (1937-1943) Dr. Clark actually used Dr. Van Til’s syllabi for some of his philosophy classes. One syllabus on Christian Apologetics in the Sangre de Cristo Seminary library has Dr. Clark’s handwritten note that it was given to him as a gift from Van Til in […]

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