Gordon Clark and Knowledge:  On Justification

  The Problem Gordon Clark wrote: Accordingly the knowledge possible for human beings consists of the axioms of and the deductions from Scripture. We can indeed entertain opinions about Columbus, and by accident or good luck they may be true; but we could not know it. Our dear pagan Plato, […]

Gordon Clark on Aristotle’s Theory of Motion

In Thales to Dewey, Gordon Clark provides a fairly detailed analysis of the basics of Aristotle’s system of thought.  These basics are still debated today because they don’t only apply to Aristotelianism.  Concepts such as definition, substance, unity, individuation, motion, space, time, etc. are ideas used by almost everybody.  However, […]

Is Knowledge Merely True Opinion?

It is entirely understandable that people would want to know how Gordon Clark defines “knowledge”.   Based on some quotes that have been going around, some people have drawn the conclusion that he thought knowledge is nothing more than true opinion.  This post is not meant to argue that Clark took […]

A Dialogue on Abstractions

The dialogue below is very closely based off an article written by Willard Van Orman Quine in 1948 called On What There Is. Quine (1908 – 2000) was one of the most influential philosophers in the 20th century.  He is, perhaps, most famous for attacking the distinction between analytic and […]

A Desire to Know or a Desire to Think I Know? (Part 2 of 2)

Solution In the previous post, A Desire to Know or a Desire to Think I Know?  (Part 1 of 2), I presented the problem that I will now try to solve.  Solve is too strong a word for what follows.  Perhaps it is an evolving solution or, rather, some suggestions […]

The Origins of Fish, Birds, Beasts, and Women

In an effort to gain a better grasp of basic philosophy, I have been listening to lectures titled The History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps by Dr. Peter Adamson, reading both Thales to Dewey and Ancient Philosophy by Gordon Clark, and also reading as much of the primary source material […]

How Does Man Know God?

By Gordon Clark   This lecture was originally published by the Trinity Foundation as How Does Man Know God?   The subject of this afternoon’s lecture is “How We Know” or perhaps, “How We Know God.” The basic question in the philosophy of religion is, How can we know God? […]

An Analysis of The Ontology of Peter Van Inwagen

Peter Van Inwagen is a modern Christian metaphysician, religious philosopher, author, and philosophy instructor at the University of Notre Dame.  He was also the president of the Society of Christian Philosophers from 2010 to 2013. In my efforts to expand my understanding of ontology, the study of “being” (i.e. being […]

Sensation and Knowledge

Today, I came across this article on Triablogue.com:  Is Scripturalism Unscriptural?  This is a good example of a typical first reaction to scripturalism and to the study of philosophy in general.  Throughout history, philosophers have discussed the question of how we can know things.  Two major questions are presented:  What […]

Review of Classical Apologetics by Sproul, Gerstner, and Lindsley

By Gordon H. Clark                 This book[1] is divided, not sharply, for each part somewhat overlaps the others in subject matter, but nevertheless is divided into two parts. The first defends the cosmological argument for the existence of God, an argument which, as […]

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